What we treat

In over 90% of cases, your JimJam physio will be able to treat your complaint without the need for an onward referral. Here are some common complaints which JimJam can help address - this list is by no means exhaustive!

Neck

Trapped Nerve

Irritation or compression of a nerve root as it leaves the neck, commonly due to disc bulges or degenerative/spondylitic change in the joints. This can result in pain, numbness, tingling, pins and needles, and occasionally weakness down the pathway of the nerve.

Acute Wry Neck

Clinically referred to as Acute Torticollis, this refers to a severely painful restriction in neck movement. Patients commonly wake up and experience this, often with no known cause.

Muscular Pain

Any pain of muscular origin, not necessarily a strain or a tear. Increased muscle tone or spasm - whilst normally a response to a separate issue - can be painful.

Postural Neck Pain

Postural or Mechanical Neck Pain is probably the most common type of neck pain we deal with. It can lead to a significant amount of pain and it is the result of sustained poor loading or postural positions. Patients commonly describe pain around the neck or upper mid back areas without a known cause.

Back Pain (lower)

Sciatica

A generic term for a nerve root irritation or compression in the lumbar spine (low back) referring pain down the leg. It is important to identify the specific cause in order to determine the best approach to managing the problem.

Facet Joint Sprain

A strain of the small joints in the lumbar spine where the vertebrae meet. There are facet joints at each level of the spine and on each side.

Low Back Muscle Spasm

This is often more of a response to an issue elsewhere than the primary problem itself. The body releases these spasms as a protective measure, but they can be detrimental to recovery.

Postural Low Back Pain

Postural or Mechanical Low Back Pain is probably the most common type of back pain we deal with. It can lead to a significant amount of pain and it is the result of sustained poor posture or poor lifting technique. Patients commonly describe pain around the low back and buttock areas without a known cause.

Back Pain (mid)

Facet Joint Sprain

A strain of the small joints in the thoracic spine where the vertebrae meet. There are facet joints at each level of the spine and on each side. Unique to the thoracic spine area, there are also other joints where the ribs join the vertebrae.

Thoracic Postural Dysfunction

Postural or Mechanical Thoracic Pain is probably the most common type of thoracic spine pain we deal with. It can lead to a significant amount of pain and is the result of sustained poor posture or poor lifting technique. Patients commonly describe pain around the mid back and shoulder blade areas without a known cause.

Joint Stiffness

Commonly experienced in conjunction with pain: if it is painful to move a certain part of your body then there is a natural reluctance to move it, which results in joint stiffness.

Shoulder

Frozen/Contracted Shoulder

This happens when the shoulder has a restricted Range Of Movement (ROM) in a very specific pattern called a capsular pattern. It can be extremely painful. Frozen/Contracted Shoulder is more common in women than in men and is prevalent in people with diabetes, or following trauma to the arm.

Rotator Cuff

The shoulder consists of a ball and socket joint. The Rotator Cuff is a group of four muscles (and their tendons) that attach to the bone to make up the ball part. This group play an important stabilising role for the shoulder.

Shoulder Impingement

The shoulder consists of a ball and socket joint. ‘Shoulder Impingement’ is a generic term for the process of 'nipping' that can occur between the ball (Humeral Head) and the socket (Glenoid Cavity). There are a number of soft tissues - including the Rotator Cuff - that occupy the space between the ball and socket.

Shoulder Instability/Dislocation

Initially associated with trauma, this is where the ball comes out of the socket. Patients can have recurrent episodes of instability/dislocation if not managed appropriately.

Knee

Patellar Tendon Problems

The Patellar Tendon is the tendon just below the kneecap, which pulls on the shin bone and straightens (extends) the knee. Problems in this area can include Tendinopathy (Jumper’s Knee), Osgood Schlatters or even Tendon Rupture.

Anterior Knee Pain

Pain affecting the front of the knee area.

Cruciate Ligament Injuries

You have two Cruciate Ligaments in the knee: the Anterior and the Posterior. They provide structural stability to the knee joint specifically in the back-to-front/front-to-back movement of the shin bone (Tibia) on the thigh bone (Femur).

Cartilage Tears

Clinically referred to as the Meniscus, the cartilage is a buffer between the two joint surfaces of the knee (the one on the inside and the one on the outside). It is essentially a shock absorber that also decreases friction during movement. Repair of the meniscus can be problematic as it has a poor blood supply.

ITB (Iliotibial Band) Friction Syndrome

A common presentation in runners, this affects the long fibrous band of fascia that runs from the outside of the pelvis to the outside of the knee. Essentially, it is an overuse injury secondary to biomechanical influences and muscle imbalance. It presents itself as pain localised to the outside of the knee.

Medial Ligament Injuries

Ligaments help stabilise joints. The Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) is located on the inside of the knee. If there is trauma to the outside of the knee, this can place stress on the MCL (a so-called ‘Valgus Stress’) which can result in ligament injury and pain felt locally around the MCL. Ligament injuries are graded from I to III (with I being mild and III being a complete rupture).

Lateral Ligament Injuries

Ligaments help stabilise joints. The Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL) is located on the outside of the knee. If there is trauma to the inside of the knee this can place stress on the LCL (a so-called ‘Varus Stress’) which can result in ligament injury and pain felt locally around the LCL. Ligament injuries are graded from I to III (with I being mild and III being a complete rupture).

Knee Arthritis

There are different types of arthritis. The most common type affecting the knee is Osteoarthritis. This develops when there are changes in the cartilage that cover the bones (this type of cartilage is different from the meniscus of the knee). Osteoarthritis often results in pain, swelling and restricted movement.

Hip and Groin

Hip Impingement

This is also known as Femero-Acetabular Impingement (FAI). The hip, like the shoulder, is a ball and socket joint. FAI refers to a process that can occur when the ball or socket (or both) are misshapen resulting in abnormal contact on movement and pain. This is most commonly felt in the hip and groin areas.

Adductor Tendon Problems

The Adductor muscle groups are most commonly referred to as the groin muscles. The tendon attaches muscle to bone. Problems involving the tendon are commonly experienced on the upper part of the inside leg.

Hip Flexor Strain

A strain of the muscles at the front of the hip. Like all muscle injuries, they can be graded from I (mild) to III (complete tear).

Trochanteric Bursitis

The Greater Trochanter is a bony prominence on the outside of the hip and is part of the thigh bone (Femur). Where the bone is close to the surface of the skin, there is a fluid-filled sac called a bursa. If the bursa becomes inflamed, this is called bursitis. This presents itself as a well-localised pain on the outside part of the hip.

Osteitis Pubis

Inflammation of the Pubic Symphysis. This can be associated with Symphysis Pubis dysfunction (SPD) and result in lower abdominal and/or pelvic pain.

Ankle

Sprained Ankle

Patients commonly describe “going over” on the ankle. Clinicians refer to this as an inversion injury, which is effectively an episode of instability. It is therefore common to damage the ligaments on the outside of the ankle when this happens.

Ankle Impingement

A presentation that occurs when soft tissues around the ankle are compressed or 'nipped'. Most commonly felt around the front and outside of the ankle, this presentation is normally associated with restricted movement and a history of trauma.

Achilles Tendon Problems

The Achilles Tendon is the large thick tendon at the back of the ankle. The most significant problem that can occur is a complete tear or rupture of the tendon. Other potential problems are commonly described as:

  • Tendonitis, which would be inflammation of the tendon, or
  • Tendinopathy/Tendinosis, which would be problems with the tendon at a cellular level.

Metatarsal Fracture

The fracturing of one of the small bones in the foot, just below the toes. This is a common football injury.

Deltoid Ligament Injury

This refers to an injury of the Deltoid Ligament on the inside of the ankle.

Tibialis Posterior Tendonitis

Pain around the tendon that runs just behind the inside of the ankle bone and inserts into the foot. This is a very common running injury.

Turf Toe

A sprain of the ligaments around the main big toe joint. This happens when the toe is moved or pulled too far upwards, and is therefore a relatively common sporting injury.

Hallux Valgus

A deformity of the main big toe joint. This is more commonly referred to as a bunion.

Hallux Rigidus

A degenerative change of the main big toe joint.

Retrocalcaneal Bursitis

This refers to inflammation of the bursa, which is located between the Achilles Tendon and the heel bone (Calcaneus).

Muscle

Hamstring Strain

The Hamstrings are actually three separate muscles located at the back of the thigh. They act to bend the knee and are very often involved in sporting injuries. These injuries are graded from I (mild) to III (complete tear).

Quadriceps Strain

Quadriceps, as the name suggests, is actually a group of four muscles around the front of the thigh. They primarily act to straighten the knee. Injuries are graded from I (mild) to III (complete tear).

Calf Strain

There are two separate calf muscles. Injuries to this area are very common - particularly in runners. These injuries are graded from I (mild) to III (complete tear).

Elbow

Tennis Elbow

This involves pain localised to the outside of the elbow and sometimes further down into the forearm. Wrist extensors are the nine muscles on the back of the forearm that action your wrist extension. They all originate from the outside of the elbow; their overuse can result in the injury known as Tennis Elbow (so-called as the wrist extension is like the backhand in tennis).

Golfer’s Elbow

This involves pain localised to the inside of the elbow and sometimes further down into the forearm. Wrist flexors are the six muscles that flex your wrist. They all originate from the inside of the elbow; their overuse can result in the injury known as Golfer’s Elbow (so-called as the wrist flexion is a common movement during golf).

Biceps Tendonitis

This is a problem affecting the biceps tendon. Pain is felt locally around the area where it inserts, at the front of the elbow. An overuse injury is particularly common in people who train or work with weights.

Olecranon Bursitis

The Ulna makes up the tip of the elbow called the Olecranon. Olecranon Bursitis refers to inflammation of the bursa, which is situated between the a bony prominence of the Ulna and the skin. It is often associated with swelling and redness.

Elbow Collateral Ligament Injury

These are injuries affecting the large ligaments on the inside and outside of the elbow joint. They are commonly injured following a fracture, dislocation or other trauma of the elbow.

Wrist and Hand

Sprained Thumb

Like any other joint sprains, this is a soft tissue injury. Pain is felt locally around the joint and is sometimes associated with swelling and restricted movement.

Wrist Sprain

A joint sprain affecting the soft tissues around the joint. Pain is felt locally around the joint and is sometimes associated with swelling and restricted movement.

De Quervains Syndrome

It is also known as De Quervains Tenosynovitis. This is a soft tissue problem associated with overuse of the thumb. Specifically, it affects the tendon sheath of two tendons that help control thumb movements.

Scaphoid Fracture

This is a fracture involving one of the small wrist bones (Carpals) called the Scaphoid. Often the result of falling on an outstretched hand, pain is localised around the base of the thumb. Swelling and restricted movement are also commonly noted.